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About Us

Our team combines 3rd generation Mexican coffee producer (Marcos Aguilar) and a leading Scandinavian sustainable food and restaurant chain COFOCO

Our farm operation focuses on quality and sustainability with respect to sourcing and processing. We handpick our local partners based on ethics and transparency. This is especially important because of climate change. To highlight this point, researchers at Kew Royal Botanic Gardens (UK) in a new study published in 2019 in Science Advances, show that climate change, deforestation, droughts and plant diseases are putting the future of coffee at risk. Hence the new sustainable initiatives we are undertaking in Mexico that aim to yield positive results by taking care of our planet and producing world-class coffee. 

Our Mexican coffee 

Our coffee beans are from the state of Veracruz. The cooler temperatures from the altitude around Teocelo and shade means the beans mature more slowly, and causes the beans to be denser. Beans with higher density develop deeper flavour and aromas. 

Mexican coffee from this region is distinguished for its nutty flavour, smooth taste, light body, and a brightness with chocolate and vanilla overtones and occasionally green apples.

Our farm, coffee and process

Our coffee farm is called “El Olmo” which refers to an endangered tree from the local area. Several “Olmo” trees on the farm are over 100 years old.

We also work with a cooperative of other farms in Mexico to supply high quality coffee cherries. This in partnership with our co-owner Marcos Aguilar who is well known Mexican environmentalist and lifelong coffee grower.

Variety:

Arabic coffee: Mundo novo, marsellesa, Costa Rica 95 & oro Azteca.

Altitude:

1300m - Strictly High grown Coffee (SHG)

Process:

Washed coffee and micro lots of natural and honey.

Notes (aroma):

Chocolate, Caramel, hazelnut

Coffee acidity:

Medium bright

Rating: 80+

We also do micro lots. And tailored solutions (number of defects, size of coffee bags etc).

Our unique sustainable approaches

Coffee is facing environmental challenges globally due to climate change. We believe we all share this responsibility and therefore we implement unique sustainable approaches: solar panels, organic compost, Tree planting, Shade grown coffee, Teocelo member of ICLEI and African drying raised beds.

Solar Panels

Following Cofoco’s 2018 solar panel park investment in Nees – Denmark, our coffee farm in Mexico operates entirely on solar panels. We are therefore 100% self-sufficient using a renewable energy source. We use 136 solar panels, each with a 365-watt peak capacity. We are the only producer in Mexico (and likely in Latin America) using solar panels for all the machinery in the milling part. Our Energy source is 100% Renewable. Surplus electricity is given back to the local community.

According to the European Photovoltaic Industry Association (EPIA), Mexico is one of the 5 countries in the world with the best conditions for solar energy, and the Mexican government in 2015 announced – as the first emerging country – its target to reduce its emission by half (in line with United Nations climate accord) – and a 2024 push to generate 35 percent of its electricity from clean sources. We want to contribute to this sustainable target by harnessing photovoltaic solar energy, which is the fastest-growing energy source in the world. Since we own the transformer, and use net metering (a billing mechanism that credits surplus electricity from solar panels to the grid), we supply any surplus electricity to our local community.

Organic compost

Coffee pulp used to make organic fertilizers and to plant trees. One organic waste product from coffee production is the pulp, which contains acidity that can damage the soil and water. We deal with this in a sustainable way.

With our partners in Teocelo, we undergo pasteurization on the waste product, cool it down to 20-25 degrees Celsius, and subsequently spread it out in layers of 20cm. Within a month, and with the help of the “Eisenia Andrei” earthworm, this waste product is being converted into organic fertilizers in both powder and liquid form. Apart from using the compost ourselves, we give some to local farmers to help them grow vegetable and seed fruit trees. We believe this organic method is especially important for coffee, as worldwide alongside tobacco, coffee is sprayed with more chemicals than any other product consumed by humans.

Tree planting – 30,000 fruit trees – and growing!

We are working to scale the tree planting project up in order to plant more trees in the state of Veracruz.

Shade grown coffee

We only produce shade-grown coffee which supports natural ecology in regard to habitat, birds, native flora, fauna, pollination, air, water and the soil. We reject the notion of sun-grown coffee, which despite producing higher yield, has an adverse effect on the ecosystem and causes deforestation.  Shade-grown coffee has a superior quality, as the coffee beans mature more slowly in the shade and natural sugars increase and enhance the flavour and aromas of the coffee. Today, sales of organically grown, shade-grown coffee only represents a mere 1%, of the U.S. market for coffee beans. However, we believe this will dramatically increase as coffee lovers become more aware of the sustainability of the shade-grown coffee.

Teocelo

In Mexico, there are 2,458 municipalities but only 46 are members of “International Council for Local Environmental Initiatives” (ICLEI) which is a global network, founded in 1990, of cities, towns and regions committed to building a sustainable future together. ICLEI’s members include 1,750 local and regional governments in 100+ countries. Teocelo was the first Mexican member of ICLEI and recognised for its handling of organic waste.  Given Teocelo’s focus on sustainability and given its coffee is among the finest grown in Mexico and among the world’s best grades, we decided to have our wet mill facility and coffee farm in the Teocelo area. Teocelo has presented their organic waste methods at Harvard University (USA) and has had scientists visit from countries such as Germany, Panama and Japan.

African drying raised beds

We use African drying raised beds to keep the cherries off the ground which allows air to circulate more easily. This gives us clean cherries that dry more evenly and thereby provides a more consistent coffee. This natural way of drying also uses less water and energy. Thereby it is an eco-friendly drying process.

African drying raised beds

We use African drying raised beds to keep the cherries off the ground which allows air to circulate more easily. This gives us clean cherries that dry more evenly and thereby provides a more consistent coffee. This natural way of drying also uses less water and energy. Thereby it is an eco-friendly drying process.

African drying raised beds

We use African drying raised beds to keep the cherries off the ground which allows air to circulate more easily. This gives us clean cherries that dry more evenly and thereby provides a more consistent coffee. This natural way of drying also uses less water and energy. Thereby it is an eco-friendly drying process.

Tree planting – 30,000 fruit trees – and growing!

In January 2020 we have initiated, with COFOCO’s help, a nursery with fruit trees, and we will subsequently plant 30,000 fruit trees on 75-hectare land in and around Tejeria, Veracruz, Mexico. Specifically, we will plant: 12,000 lime persa trees, 4,000 allspice trees, 5,000 guanabana trees and 9,000 avocado trees – using regenerative farming principles including using the pulp from our coffee production as organic compost.

We do this, as the coffee crop and biodiversity are in a state of crisis*, in order to support local farmers (single mothers and low-income families), diversify crops and help with the urgent problem of deforestation** / C02 emission*** / climate change.

 * A paper presented at the International Coffee Science Association conference predicted that plunging coffee prices may be pressuring farmers to carve out land in rainforests for survival, and may drive deforestation by more than 100,000 hectares yearly – worldwide.
** According to the United Nations (Food and Agriculture Organization – called FAO), Mexico lost 3.2 million hectare of forest land between 2001-2017 – equating to a 6% loss.  34% of the fauna in Mexican forest is endemic and 12% will be lost in a few years if the deforestation continues at the current rate
*** 30,000 fruit trees will absorb 840,000kg C02 annually according to official research numbers from Conanyt in Mexico.
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